Tag Archives: Alliance

What Can You Do

There are so many ways for you to come alongside. We are working hard to establish relationships or partners with individuals and churches in Canada. Usually, there are 2 types of relationships… donors (one-way) and partners (2 way super highway). We want super highway partners. We enjoy 2 way interaction much more than one way. And lots of it. This means clear accountability with involvement in time, money and prayer support for each other.

Cuba_234 copy

We hope that as you become involved in what we do, this understanding of what you can do translates into how you view the local community around you and your area. What can you do to change a life? It’s very straightforward.

 

  • Linda sends out a prayer update called Poppin’ in for Prayer. If you want to receive our prayer needs & you want to be prayed for, email Linda.
  • Many people in Canada holiday in Costa Rica. If you come, please contact us. We can assist you in many ways.
  • Is your Alliance church or group looking at visiting Latin America for a short term trip, we can point you in the right direction.
  • We are involved in a variety of projects and endeavours to physically help the poor. You can receive a tax deductible receipt for your donation. There are separate accounts to focus your desire.  Talk to us. We are involved with projects in several Spanish-speaking countries.
  • In general, you can support the world-wide team of international Alliance workers and their general living needs by giving to the Global Advance Fund.

 

Haiti_480 copyYou, are part of our toolbox. As mentioned before, we are building the tools in our toolbox to do life and ministry with.  We rely on the strength of “team”. The number one tool is prayer. You pray for us and we pray for you. Very simple concept. Support with finances is also an important aspect. Like all C&MA International Workers, we rely on financial donations to support our endeavours in other countries. By your giving to the “Global Advance Fund” or the GAF , you assist all International Workers throughout the world with their basic living costs. Each International Worker is responsible for the finances of their individual ministries. You can focus your donations to the project you feel led to support. Money can be given to “Approved Specials”. Because Linda and I are regional workers, we have different Approved Special accounts for different ministry focuses. To give, all you have to do is designate which Approved Special you want to give to. Tax-deductible receipts are provided.

 

APPROVED SPECIALS (APS)

Approved specials provide the means to direct your financial gifts to a specific people group, ministry project or country. These special designations will differ depending on the ministry focus of the individual International worker. Here are our  APS’s. They do not cover all of our projects but remember, if needed, we can introduce a new APS if it is deemed appropriate.

 1. CDRT or Community Development Readiness Team 

This APS focuses on the needs surrounding the development of trained, culturally-relevant leaders in the Sun Region. The vision is through the local Alliance church, develop a international network of trained leaders and trainers within the community transformational principles of CHE.

2. SunCompassion – Costa Rica

This APS focus on addressing the direct physical needs of the poor and disenfranchised in Costa Rica. This can include  children’s school supplies and uniforms, VBS, sewing machines and material, micro-business loans, Bibles, Children’s Christmas fiestas, support for drug rehab to name a few areas.

3. Tarahumara

This APS covers the support of our ministry projects with the indigenous group, the Tarahumara, in the Copper Canyon area of northern Mexico. This is the APS that is designated to receive the donations toward the building of the women’s shelter/medical clinic in Guacayvo.

To give securely online go to

http://www.cmacan.org/give

1. Choose on line giving
2. Fill the form out. Under Donation Allocation, choose Caribbean Sun – General
3. The form will refresh, then under designation – choose the APS you want to give to

Who We Are

TH_507Curtis and Linda are international workers with the Christian & Missionary Alliance in Canada. We are regional leaders of a compassion oriented work in the Central/South America, Caribbean and Mexico. We are currently based in Salitral de Santa Ana, Costa Rica. We call our ministry SunCompassion.

We are part of the ministry movement of Justice and Compassion for the Christian & Missionary Alliance in Canada.

Our Canadian base is in the Calgary area. Our two children (Jordan and Briana) are living, working and going to school there. We are members of the High River Alliance Church. In High River, Curtis worked as a fire fighter, a youth pastor at HRBC, and at the public high school as a counselor. Linda was a lifeguard/instructor as well as several years at Ambrose University College in administrative support.

We completed Spanish language school at ILE located in San Jose, Costa Rica in 2009. Prior to arriving in San Jose,  Costa Rica, Linda and Curtis were located in Quito, Ecuador with the Christian & Missionary Alliance of Canada at the Alliance International Academy.

If you are a social media user, you can connect with us on FaceBook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

AJC_Logo_v2_Museo_Blue TheAlliance_Logo_Horizontal_v2A_Colour

We Have Proof…

We have proof…that God is at work! Our last two days of work needs it’s own blog to describe how we have seen God at work, literally!
We left for the Limón prison to be with a team from the Alliance “jungle” church for their weekly visit to a men’s high-security jail. They expected to have 2 baptisms. When we got there, 6 men wanted to be baptized. Here is Linda’s description of what happened. (Sorry, no pictures as I couldn’t take my camera in).
What made me come alive yesterday was walking into the Limon Prison & stepping into what could’ve been the New Testament! What an experience to witness a Christ-movement. Wow!
We were invited by our Alliance Sarapaqui Pastors to attend a baptism of 2 men from their prison ministry & God began moving in their hearts before we even came. Two men were to give their testimony & be baptized but God had other plans. Yesterday not only 2 were dunked in a  40 gallon barrel but 20!
My mind was thinkin’ “this must be what happened when Christ would come into a town, preach & started baptizing”. Well, the same movement happened yesterday with Pastor Rodrigo preaching & inviting men to radically change their lives, & proclaim that they are Christ’s. What started out as 2 became 6, & as the men heard the Pastor & Curtis praying for them, saw these prisoners make a proclamation of faith, it had men passing the small bucket outside to get more water so that MORE men could be baptized as well.
I had so many thoughts racing through my mind & heart this afternoon. Yesterday I experienced what salvation, in a very dark place, looked like. I saw GRACE in action, I saw tenderness on hardened men as they sang or stood in adoration after the ceremony, I could almost hear the angels rejoicing over not just 2 but 20! Tears flowed down my face as I thought of what Christ would do for one lost sheep but He brought 20 home!!
This was a day that my heart resonated loudly & saw the power of the Spirit move in these men’s hearts. I didn’t understand all that was said (it was all in Spanish) but I could see the impact of the presence among these men today.
My last farewell to these men as we left the prison was seeing them clasped together in cuffs to be taken back to the barracks. What were freed men in Christ today are still chained men to their consequence of their sin.

The next day, we visited Cecilia and her family. If you have been following our adventures, you know who she is. If you don’t, you need to look at past blogs. She moved to a community called La Lidia. 
La Lidia is a community far from nowhere. We drove a really bad road to get there, past fields of yuca, pineapple and banana. If you can find work, you find it as a laborer in one of these fields. It’s common to get up at 3am, cycle to work by 4am and work till 4pm. Lunch is very short as you would rather keep moving in the heat that just sitting there. All for $10/day. Houses are made of plastic over a wooden branch frame or if you have the skills to make a house from tree, you make a makeshift building. 
Cecilia knows that these people need Christ. She has become a mother to many. Yesterday for the weekly kid’s program, there were 70 kids. She told me she gets as many as 130. It’s a day filled with music, games and Sunday School. (Then there is the women’s ministry…another time)
Many come everyday just to hang out and get food. I do not know how she does this as the family makes about $400/month. The kids are loved and and taught Biblical values and morals. I had a blast. For hours, I played foose ball on this old table that we would normally use for firewood! The kids kept repeating my name so they could get the pronunciation correct. Living conditions are so poor. A 13 year old girl has basically lived on green plantains (cooking bananas) for the last 6 months. I talked with two boys who have absolutely nothing, even food and they rely on Cecilia and her family. Most of these kids cannot read. Those that can afford to go to school (about $150/yr), still can’t read and they certainly don’t get the 3 “R’s”. Most of the kids are barefoot. At the mininum, 70 pairs of shoes are needed for the kids that are at the local school.
Cecilia, her husband Marcos, and their son and wife, Gerson and Rocio, have the biggest hearts. Wow! They hope to add 6 computers + English + more reading + more math…. to their program to give the kids a future and hope.  Please pray for them as they will be hosting 4 different Christmas parties for about 650 kids this month. She says “God will provide” and He does. 
Can you help? You are part of the answer! If you can help financially, support for food or schooling or shoes or a Christmas fiesta, email me at suncompassionla@gmail.com and we can work together to help out.

Guatemala, Mexico and More

Things are frantic around here as we plan and pack for 1 month of traveling. We have to pack for the heat and humidity of Mexico and the rain, dryness, heat, snow, cold and mosquitos of Canada. We have regional meetings in Mexico (that’s where the biggest group of International Worker’s live) and then we travel up to Canada for General Assembly in Winnipeg but more about that later.

Last I wrote, we hade two trips ahead. One to Guatemala and a return trip to the Tarahumara of Mexico. First, I had gone to Guatemala to join in a week-long YWAM-sponsored course on micro-loans focusing on the poor of Latin-America. This course was arranged by a local Alliance church, Iglesia Galilea. They have a focused community development program with schools, smokeless stoves and building new housing structures. We were shown a Mayan village where they have a strong ministry focus. This village gets shut off every raining season because there are 4 rivers to cross to get there. I had a great time playing with the kids at the local school. A special part of this course was that many from the community and local government attended so they could in-turn help their community. And they all were presented with a clear message of the Gospel and the Biblical theology of why you help others in need!  It was all in Spanish so I lasted pretty well through the first 3 days before my brain just didn’t want to work anymore. The course was informative and I was able to take away many highlights.  I had several outside meetings with other ministries that could lead into strong partnerships. I love how God brings these people into my path. It happens over and over. We also spent some time in Antigua. It’s a beautiful place to see.

On our return trip to the Copper Canyon, Linda and I brought in another $18,000 that many of you gave to the Global Emergency Relief Fund of the C&MA. Based on our last trip, this will buy about 14 tons of food that will be distributed to about 1700-1800 people. We did not have an Alliance Men’s work team to help us so I was wondering how we would be able to separate the 100lbs sack of food into 1 kg bags without a big group. When we were in Guacayvo, the kids came through and I think we were ready to distribute earlier than when the adults had helped :).  After providing a hot meal and Pastor Tomás giving the Gospel to the group, we gave out food to about 225 families. This was less than last time as it was reported to us that many were sick and could not make the hike. We went to the second village, the same area as last time, but we went a bit further in to a more central meeting point. At one point in the traveling, we crossed over a dirt airstrip and we were told this was a drug cartel airstrip. Here we fed about 180 families. This was also less than less time but many of the males had been literally taken by the military to “volunteer” to fight forest fires. For both villages, we were joined by a Dr from Virginia who was on his 18th volunteer trip in to run medical clinics. We also  were with 2 contractors who were doing an evaluation of water systems and buildings and drew up plans for a possible improvement project.  Again what a blessing to be part of this humanitarian aid. Pray as we plan for the next step. I am looking to take an agriculturist specialist and a Geologist/Water specialist as we look at finding a local spot to drill a well and provide much-needed water and build into the ability to expand their agriculture ability.

We will be in Winnipeg for a week for General Assembly C&MA. I have the privilege of being a co-presenter along with two other members of the world-wide Justice & Compassion team. Linda and I have 3 other speaking engagements that you are welcome to come to. At High River Baptist Church on June 28 at 7pm. At High River Alliance Church on July 8 at 10am and at Brooks Alliance Church on July 15 at for the morning service. And we get to spend time with family and friends!!!!

Alliance church with house at back

I want to leave you with one story from Guatemala. This was back in the woods near the Mayan village we went to that gets cut off by 4 rivers. We were getting a tour by a local Alliance pastor through the community and saw the church which Linda said it looked like an outhouse; but it was a building donated from a local owner. At one point, I had asked the pastor about his family but he didn’t answer me. Later, our guide told us this story. This pastor and his family had been living outside of the community. Their young son, less than 10 years old, was found dead on the river bank outside of the community. He had been sexually abused and then killed. The community took an active role in helping and they found the man who had done this. It turned out that several kids had disappeared in this community and everyone had their suspicions who had done it but nothing had been done judicially. Remember, we are back away from any large towns. This is also a culture that went through many years of civil war and the scars run deep. This time, the man was taken to the police and he is now in jail. Here is the scary thing. If the evidence against this man disappears, the local police have no reason to keep this man jailed. The family of this man have made several threats against this Alliance pastor, his wife and 2 remaining kids. If this family is killed, (remember the recent civil war) then there is no evidence against this sexual predator. If the family is killed, he is released back into their community.  The family is the only evidence that this child was killed in such a way. So they have moved to live immediately behind this little church for safety. This pastor says he will not move away. God has him and his family there for a reason. Please pray for his safety and God’s ability to work through this dangerous situation.

Almost 14 Tons of Food Aid

Well, the final numbers from March are in from providing an emergency food aid to the Tarahumara people group who live in the Copper Canyon area of Mexico. Almost 14 tons of food was purchased from funds provided by the Global Emergency Relief Fund of the C&MA. About a 1000 of the 1800 people served received about 50lbs of food that was to last them for several weeks. The rest receive about 25 lbs of food. The boarding school at Guacayvo received several weeks of food for the kids at the school who have nothing. And you may ask what is the point? Well, Isaiah 58 says to all of us that we are share our food with the hungry and provide the shelter for the homeless and cloth the naked so the the chains of injustice are broken and the oppressed are freed. And you know what, Linda and I get to do it all over again.

We travel back to the Copper Canyon for the last week of May. We saw evidence of how showing this love by giving needed food opened up hearts to hearing about what the love of Jesus is all about. And this in a culture where there is no word for “love”! Pray for us as we get to be apart of this amazing compassion response. Pray for the strengthening of relationships and hearts to be open to who Jesus is. Pray as we continue to evaluate the living conditions of the Tarahumara and how sustainable responses to their poverty and health can be addressed.

Back in Costa Rica, we continue to work with a group of Nicaraguan women in a barrio. They have a weekly Bible study and they have committed to reach into their community through a sewing cooperative. We met with the cooperative leadership last week for a leadership development training time. It’s is so exciting to see them take ownership of their community. The group received their first big order – 40 bags!

Along this line of sewing…we are finding that sewing machines are a tool of community development that works. Another local community would like to start a cooperative. With that being said, I have a question for all of you. A thrift store in Salmon Arm wants to donate sewing machines. But the question is how do we get them down here. Any ideas? One idea given is to ship them down. Anybody have any expertise in this area? Is anybody willing to ship them down (by boat) for us? Lot’s of questions. I need to compare the cost of shipping vs the cost of buying new machines local (but imported). Let me know.

Our schedule until mid-July is busy. May 11, I fly to Guatemala for a YWAM sponsored micro-business training session. I will be there for a week. After one day at home, Linda and I will be in the Copper Canyon for an additional short-term food aid. One week there, 2 weeks at home and then we are gone for a month. This includes a regional ministry retreat in Mexico and flying up to Canada for General Assembly. We will have 12 days in the Calgary area that I am looking forward to.

Some of you have been giving to our Approved Special account. This is a ministry directed account. It is called “The Patarra Project“. Patarra is the barrio where the soup kitchen is and the kids that need help with either food or schooling costs. Because our community development work in Costa Rica is expanding in coming along churches that also are part of addiction counseling and prison ministry, we have had to change our Approved Special focus. It is now called “SunCompassion / Costa Rica” which better reflects our justice and compassion work in this country. So if you would like to give directly to an area, designate it to SunCompassion / Costa Rica and let us know what area you want it directed to. I also want to thank those that give to the Global Advance Fund. This is what supports International Workers world-wide with their living costs.

Tarahumara Part Dos

I fully expected to get to the second part of our Mexico trip quickly but emergency gallbladder surgery and all the pain leading up to it lead me down a different path. Here goes Part 2.

Flying into Ciudad Juarez, we just didn’t know what to expect. We were told it was the most dangerous city in the world. In actuality, it is one of the most dangerous cities in the world but in reality, it is like any other city in the world, where there is danger for the unwary. Thankfully, the cartels are taking it easy until government elections in July when there is a general fear the street fighting will start up again. Brenda, a ministry team leader for the Tarahumara, said to us it so difficult not to stop when you see someone bleeding out in the street, knowing you cannot stop for fear of your own life. Life is so different in other places and as we hadn’t been to see the people of the Tarahumara yet, I didn’t realize how true that statement is – Life is so different in other places. Yet, our God is God of it all.

Rio Chico

We are in Mexico because of the food problem. The people of the Tarahumara don’t have any. People are dying. Suicide due to lack of hope is high. From the Global Emergency Relief Fund of the C&MA of Canada, we were bringing in an $18,000 installment for food aid, to supply food to about 300 families that Pastor Tomás and his Mexican ministry team were working with. Except the money transfer did not arrive on time but God was faithful to provide. We left for Rio Chico the morning after arriving in Juaréz. We had eight hours of driving across the Sierras. Rio Chico is the mid-way point to the Copper Canyon. It is a camp that Pastor Tomás and his team built that serves the youth of the Juaréz area. Many Alliance churches in western Canada and in the States along with the Alliance Men’s work teams had a hand in making this camp happen.

There was at least another 8-10 hour drive to the Canyon and we still had to buy food. We bought almost 8 tons or 71 metric tonnes of food that morning before heading out in a convoy of 5 vehicles including an Alliance Men’s work team that was coming to help with the food distribution. Our destination was Guacayvo, the boarding school located deep in the Copper Canyon. Linda says she is thankful we arrived there at night. I remember seeing a pin point of light as I looked straight down into the darkness of the Canyon. I found out that was where we were going….over 2000 ft straight down over a road so tight that the 1/2 ton could not make it around a switch back or two in one turn. Two of our vehicles, including the food transport truck had to stay at the top as they just couldn’t handle the road down.

We arrived at the boarding school. The school was originally built as a contact point with the local Tarahumara to show them the Gospel through love and action. The local kids had no school option. And the parents you need to understand, in their culture, school is not important, it is not a cultural value. But, you would receive food there so parents started to drop their kids off. Literally, drop them off. There are kids there that no one knows who the parents are!!! The government supplies a local teacher and now kids are receiving some learning too. The road down to the school is only 2 years old so for the previous 10 years, everything was carried in by burro over hours of trails. When I say everything, that means all the food, the cement to build the school and the 600lb wood stove to cook the food and more.

In the morning, we saw where we were. Astounding. In a valley, deeeepp in a valley, miles from everywhere with no signs of local civilization. Yet the word was out…there was to be food given. People started coming out of the rock, literally, walking over 8 hours knowing they would get a hot meal and a bag of food. We had to ferry the food down from the top of the canyon and start separating the food into smaller packets. We had rice, beans, flour, corn meal, pasta, oil….each family group receiving over 25 lbs of food. I had a census done and I figure we supplied food to about 935 people that day.

And this was only our first group of the Tarahumara to feed. The adventure would continue…

Isa 58:6-7 says

6 “Is not this the kind of fasting I have chosen: 
to loose the chains of injustice 
   and untie the cords of the yoke, 
to set the oppressed free 
   and break every yoke? 
7 Is it not to share your food with the hungry 
   and to provide the poor wanderer with shelter— 
when you see the naked, to clothe them,