Tag Archives: Malnutrition

Almost 14 Tons of Food Aid

Well, the final numbers from March are in from providing an emergency food aid to the Tarahumara people group who live in the Copper Canyon area of Mexico. Almost 14 tons of food was purchased from funds provided by the Global Emergency Relief Fund of the C&MA. About a 1000 of the 1800 people served received about 50lbs of food that was to last them for several weeks. The rest receive about 25 lbs of food. The boarding school at Guacayvo received several weeks of food for the kids at the school who have nothing. And you may ask what is the point? Well, Isaiah 58 says to all of us that we are share our food with the hungry and provide the shelter for the homeless and cloth the naked so the the chains of injustice are broken and the oppressed are freed. And you know what, Linda and I get to do it all over again.

We travel back to the Copper Canyon for the last week of May. We saw evidence of how showing this love by giving needed food opened up hearts to hearing about what the love of Jesus is all about. And this in a culture where there is no word for “love”! Pray for us as we get to be apart of this amazing compassion response. Pray for the strengthening of relationships and hearts to be open to who Jesus is. Pray as we continue to evaluate the living conditions of the Tarahumara and how sustainable responses to their poverty and health can be addressed.

Back in Costa Rica, we continue to work with a group of Nicaraguan women in a barrio. They have a weekly Bible study and they have committed to reach into their community through a sewing cooperative. We met with the cooperative leadership last week for a leadership development training time. It’s is so exciting to see them take ownership of their community. The group received their first big order – 40 bags!

Along this line of sewing…we are finding that sewing machines are a tool of community development that works. Another local community would like to start a cooperative. With that being said, I have a question for all of you. A thrift store in Salmon Arm wants to donate sewing machines. But the question is how do we get them down here. Any ideas? One idea given is to ship them down. Anybody have any expertise in this area? Is anybody willing to ship them down (by boat) for us? Lot’s of questions. I need to compare the cost of shipping vs the cost of buying new machines local (but imported). Let me know.

Our schedule until mid-July is busy. May 11, I fly to Guatemala for a YWAM sponsored micro-business training session. I will be there for a week. After one day at home, Linda and I will be in the Copper Canyon for an additional short-term food aid. One week there, 2 weeks at home and then we are gone for a month. This includes a regional ministry retreat in Mexico and flying up to Canada for General Assembly. We will have 12 days in the Calgary area that I am looking forward to.

Some of you have been giving to our Approved Special account. This is a ministry directed account. It is called “The Patarra Project“. Patarra is the barrio where the soup kitchen is and the kids that need help with either food or schooling costs. Because our community development work in Costa Rica is expanding in coming along churches that also are part of addiction counseling and prison ministry, we have had to change our Approved Special focus. It is now called “SunCompassion / Costa Rica” which better reflects our justice and compassion work in this country. So if you would like to give directly to an area, designate it to SunCompassion / Costa Rica and let us know what area you want it directed to. I also want to thank those that give to the Global Advance Fund. This is what supports International Workers world-wide with their living costs.

Getting Food on the Table

Are there ever any times during the year when there is absolutely no food for your table? The kids are hungry and Dad and Mom are in despair. Read on!

The last 2 weeks have been a whirlwind for us. I started of in El Salvador spending 4 days with C&MA pastors from all over Central America. Once they understood that our ministry was in compassion work, we heard many stories of needs, usually centered around the poverty conditions for the kids in their communities. I am planning a driving trip through 3-4 countries to meet with the pastors and assess needs in the New Year. During my time there, I received word that a person from an Alliance church wanting to donate a sum of money for a clean water project so I was scrambling to gather information. It appears that a clean water source will be built for a children’s ministry in Honduras with the help of a partnering ministry (eMi). Pray for the details to work out.

After a 12 hour “layover” at home, I joined a Canadian Food Grains Bank delegation in Honduras. We visited with poor Honduran farmers and local development organizations about conservation agriculture. Through conservation/organic techniques, small-plot farmers (less than 2 acres) are able to increase their yields to beyond “subsistence” to actual selling produce at a market. This means that many farmers have been able to go from having no food to eat several times a year to having food to put on the table and actually think about having enough seed for the next crop. All of these farmers live in poor areas with varying soil conditions. After adopting new organic techniques, some farmers were able to afford to send some of their kids to school. It was very gratifying to see that through changing  their farming techniques to that of respect for the land around them, the land gave back. Reforestation, erosion prevention, water retention, crop rotations were some of the transferable and organic principles we worked with. These farmers had a history of killing the soil with crop burning and heavy use of insecticides/herbicides. To paint a clearer picture, this all occurred up in the mountains where soil differed from place to place and farming was being done on slopes up to 60 degrees. Very steep! Needless to say, we walked many mountain-sides.  I learned many new ways of assessing and enabling communities in their food needs towards poverty reduction.


Linda kept busy and adventurous while I was gone. She drove by herself for the first time with the local traffic conditions. Our regional directors were traveling too so Linda helped keep their household organized and making sure the girls got to school. She continues to develop her prayer ministry. I know that she communicates with several of you.

Continue to pray for the needs of the Alliance workers world-wide. Financial support was very short of the needed goal last month to provide for the basic living needs of the international workers. This has created budget issues. Linda and I remain faithful that our needs of funds to purchase our ministry vehicle will be supplied. As we look to the future, pray that God goes before us as we strive to work compassionately through the local churches to reach out to those in their communities that don’t know Jesus.